Does Barnes & Noble Stock My Book?

November 4, 2017

Yesterday, I learned something by accident, the way I learn most things. Another writer on a forum I follow asked if there was a way to see if Barnes & Noble stocked her books in their stores. Out of curiosity, I tried to find out if they stocked my most recent book, Glorious Times: Adventures of the Craighead Naturalists, in any of their stores. So, I searched on BN.com Glorious Times and, near the top of the list, was a link to my book’s page on BN.com. Clicking on that brought up this page:

Barnes and Noble

Several lines below the price, just above Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought, in small print, is a link titled Check Store Availability. Clicking on that brings up a window into which you type the ZIP Code for a specific area. I found no way to search nationwide or even statewide with a single ZIP. I typed in 17011 for Camp Hill, PA, where the nearest Barnes & Noble store is located. Up popped a photo of the store and (drum roll here) IN STOCK. Below it was a photo of the Lancaster store and NOT IN STOCK.

It appears that the search is done for what looks like a 50-mile radius. Typing in 20001 for Washington, DC confirmed that guess because it listed 18 stores with some as far away as Baltimore and Frederick in Maryland and Fredericksburg in Virginia.

A bonus for authors wanting to set up book talks in an area is that the mailing address and phone number for each store, whether it stocks your book or not, is listed.

 

 

 

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Renewed Interest in the Oorang Indians

September 23, 2017

Oorang Indians Willis.jpg

Yesterday’s mail brought an unexpected pleasure. I opened a package that obviously contained a book. But I had no memory of ordering a book from anyone. The label said it was from Rowman & Littlefield in Blue Ridge Summit, Pennsylvania. I knew some book publishers made their home in that town as the late John Kallmann had once worked for a publisher located there. I still had no idea what book it might be.

Opening the package, I found a copy of Walter Lingo, Jim Thorpe, and the Oorang Indians: How a Dog Kennel Owner Created the NFL’s Most Famous Traveling Team by Chris Willis. It was a book I knew was coming out because Chris and I had conversed about the topic and a question he had about Eagle Feather led to some serious investigation and a series of blog posts about this mysterious player.

Wanting to thank him for the book, I tried to send Chris an email, but couldn’t find his address. An inopportune computer crash in early August had wreaked havoc had lost numerous email messages and addresses. (Perhaps I should write about the fallacies of making backups using Microsoft’s utility.) I would appreciate it if someone would send me his email address.

The book had a feel different from others I’d felt. That it had no jacket because the jacket information was printed directly on the hard cover wasn’t new. What was new was the feel of it. Rather than having a hard, glossy finish, the cover had a matt finish that is soft to the touch.

Inside this beautiful book, I found an acknowledgement to me. An entire paragraph. WOW! Thank you, Chris.

Over the last couple of years, I had received questions from multiple persons about the Oorang Indians. Apparently, this most unusual NFL team had gathered renewed interest. Maybe the NFL needs to rejuvenate the team to attract fans. It needs to do something after tickets for Thursday’s Rams-49ers game went for $15!

 

Book Reviews Are Pouring In

August 21, 2017

preorder-cover-tinyReviews are coming in for Glorious Times: Adventures of the Craighead Naturalists. Hooray! The pleasant surprise is that they are positive. Here are links to several of them:

https://www.forewordreviews.com/reviews/glorious-times/

https://livelytimes.com/2017/08/tom-benjey-glorious-times-adventures-craighead-naturalists/

http://bigskyjournal.com/books/books-reading-west-2

http://www.theusreview.com/first-reviews/Glorious-Times-by-Tom-Benjey.html#.WZsHpeRK2Uk

http://www.outsidebozeman.com/lifestyle/inside-bozeman/books-music/kick-your-feet

https://issuu.com/um_crown_gye/docs/crown_of_the_continent_and_greater__3e306117692e88

http://www.midwestbookreview.com/lbw/jun_17.htm

 

Good News for the Redskins

July 1, 2017

This was a great week for the Washington Redskins. According to an Associated Press article, the U. S. Department of Justice decided to drop the attempt by the U. S. Patent and Trademark Office to cancel the Redskins’ trademarks. In 2014, the government canceled the Redskins’ trademarks, because they considered it disparaging. The team appealed that decision. That appeal had been on hold pending the outcome of another case, Matal v. Tam, which was decided on June 19 by the Supreme Court.

Voting 8-0 (Justice Gorsuch was not seated when the case was heard and took no part in the decision), the Supreme Court decided that the name “Slants” used by an Asian-American rock group was protected speech under the First Amendment ruling the part of the Lanham Act which prevented registration of trademarks that employ disparaging name unconstitutional. Thus the U. S. Patent and Trademarks Office cannot block the registration of a name on the grounds that it is considered disparaging.

This Supreme Court decision essentially voided the cancelation of the Redskins trademark rendering the appeal unnecessary. The Redskins have won and can continue using the name they have had since 1933. What isn’t known is how the eastern media, The Washington Post and Boston Globe in particular, will react. Will they continue their campaign Captain Ahab-like in their war against the Redskins or will they accept the ruling of the Court and polls of Native Americans? Based on the phony claims made by the Boston Globe in the not distant past, it seems unlikely.

http://pro32.ap.org/article/justice-department-gives-washington-redskins-name-fight

Unknown Photos of Lone Star Dietz

May 14, 2017

One of the benefits of having done all that research necessary to write Lone Star Dietz’s biography is that people who come across artifacts related to him contact me. The most common things people ask about are paintings attributed to Dietz. Based on the number I’ve seen and know about, plus those people own and ask about, Lone Star must have been fairly prolific. The most unusual thing someone has inquired about was a button/pin for the 1923 Thanksgiving football game between the Louisiana Tech Bulldogs and Centenary College Gentlemen. The image of Lone Star Dietz, Louisiana Tech’s head football coach at the time, adorned the button.

This week, I was sent images of three undated photos of Lone Star Dietz. They appear to be early photos of him, probably the earliest in Indian regalia. I can’t identify the origin of this regalia because I don’t know how to discern the differences between the designs employed by the various tribes and nations. And what he wore was very different than the elaborate Sioux outfit that he was often photographed wearing. The earliest known photo of Dietz was as a member of the 1903 Macalester College football team. Whether these photos predate that one is an open question.

The earliest dated photo of Dietz in his Sioux headdress, war shirt and leggings was published in the January 26, 1908 St. Louis Globe-Democrat Sunday magazine. That photo was likely taken in late 1907 in Carlisle, PA or in St. Louis, when the Carlisle football team made train connections in St. Louis. Dietz had probably established a relationship with someone on the paper when he worked at the St. Louis World’s Fair in 1904. The photos I was shown this week were very different from anything I had seen before. He was wearing a breechcloth, pipebag, simple leather headband with two feathers, and above-the-calf bells.

My guess was that, since one of the three poses in these photos, appeared to be one of a dancer, complete with bells, these photos were taken in or before late fall of 1907. Shortly after arriving at the Academy of Industrial Design in Philadelphia on his outing period, Lone Star put on a demonstration that included a dance. But the newspaper coverage of his dance described him as wearing a war bonnet, probably the headdress he commonly wore in photos. So, I have little to go on with regard to dating these photographs.

The photos are not shown here, nor is the name and location of the owner. That person wishes to remain anonymous due to the acrimonious treatment so often meted out by those people who oppose the use of Redskins for the name of the Washington NFL team.

Glorious Times Selected as Award Finalist

March 27, 2017

Foreword Reviews just informed me that Glorious Times: Adventures of the Craighead Naturalists has been selected as a Finalist in its 2016 Book of the Year Awards: https://awards.forewordreviews.com/books/glorious-times-adventures-of-the-craighead-naturalists/

The books considered for awards are books from smaller publishers, including university presses. Foreword explains their purpose this way:

In the publishing industry, we talk a lot about independent publishers. What exactly does that mean? Well, it’s hard to define. In the strictest sense, we mean anyone other than the powerful Big Five: Penguin Random House, Hachette, HarperCollins, Macmillan, and Simon & Schuster. Though they publish some important, thought-provoking titles, they hardly need help bringing them to market.

On Saturday, April 1st, at 2:00 p.m., I will be giving my first book talk ever at Midtown Scholars Bookstore in Harrisburg, PA. This talk will be about a small portion of my new book—it contains too much information for a single talk to cover, so I’m focusing on how teenagers can impact the country.

https://calendar.google.com/calendar/render?eid=aTNvY3NnZjIzZ2wybHU1MnJxODI2dG9qMW8gdnNtbmlwMXU1OWlrMTVxNmZlN243NTZic29AZw&ctz=America/New_York&t=AKUaPmbwX1qXEeBRi2rvNZsyW3ndmn2KWcWhtdZY2czdMCqDwWZXBoPnC53ykF7BCAsVUoTwVZKRDJalHwQcZ_nsrRMQGaW38A%3D%3D&sf=true&output=xml#eventpage_6

 

Me No Mexican

March 6, 2017

Carolyn Smith shares the photo of a previously unknown Lone Star Dietz painting with us, saying:

“I believe it is entitled “Me no Mexican” to show the problems of some Indians who were mistakenly identified as Mexicans and deported back to Mexico, despite their vehemence that they were not Mexican.

“My father was a Protestant missionary and head of religious activities at Haskell Institute for awhile after 15 years with the Indians in Nevada.

“I’ve always been fond of this painting because of the emotion in the Indian’s face.  My granddaughter was always scared of the painting!”

Lone Star Dietz began coaching the Haskell Institute football team in 1929 and continued living there several years after he was no longer coaching them, likely into the mid-1930s. It was there, in Lawrence, Kansas, that Rev. Smith met Dietz. It was likely during this period that Dietz traveled to the southwestern states to paint local sites and people during his vacations.

The following is inscribed on the back of the painting, probably in Smith’s hand:

“When a Hopi was accused by his people of giving away Kiva secrets to white men, he left his reservation to find work with Mexican laborers.  Later, finding himself rounded up with a group of Mexican wetbacks, in custody of the United States Immigration Service, he was in danger of being deported.  It was then he broke his silence, crying out in broken English, ‘Me no Mexican.’

“This painting by Lone Star Dietz is an interpretation of the Hopi’s wounded spirit at the prospect of deportation.”

 

Book Talk in Florida

February 4, 2017

 

The publisher of Glorious Times: Adventures of the Craighead Naturalists,University of Montana Press, reports that copies of the book are now in the hands of the distributor, Farcountry Press. The distributor supplies books to libraries and bookstores.

http://www.farcountrypress.com/details.php?id=708

People desiring copies of the book signed by the author can get them at http://www.tuxedo-press.com/.

Those on Florida’s west coast can attend a talk given by the author at 3:00 pm Wednesday, February 8 at Collier County Museum, 3331 E. Tamiami Trail, Naples, FL 34112.

More about the Craigheads’ connections with Florida can be found at: http://www.colliergov.net/your-government/divisions-f-r/museums/collier-county-museum.

 

 

 

New Article on the Craighead Naturalists

December 27, 2016

The January/February 2017 issue of The Penn Stater, the Penn State University alumni magazine, contains an article titled “Three of a Kind.” The three of a kind are Frank Jr. and John, the Craighead twins, and their younger sister Jean, best known by her married name, Jean Craighead George. The three siblings all graduated with bachelors degree from Penn State College, well before it became a university. However, they were far from the first members of the family to attend the school. Several Craigheads have matriculated there, including the father and two uncles of Jean and the twins, as well as two of their first cousins The Penn Stater needs to run a piece that explores the careers of Frank “Rattlesnake” Craighead, who accomplished more in retirement than most do during their active careers, his brothers Charles, an eminent metallurgist, and orchard entomologist and fly fisherman extraordinaire Eugene, who was also the father of two Penn State alums, Sam and Bill. Bill and Sam also pursued careers involving the study of nature.

If Penn State had royalty, the Craigheads would certainly be a family of high ranking.

2017-penn-stater-jan-feb-1

 

 

Time for Christmas

November 28, 2016

Halleluiah! Copies of my latest book have finally arrived, just in time for Christmas. Signed copies can be ordered at http://www.tuxedo-press.com/. A review follows:

preorder-cover-tinyForeWord Reviews

Summer Issue 2016

In this genealogy of the Craighead family, the author explores the history and exploits of this famously nature-oriented clan.

The tale of the Craigheads begins with the dawn of the American colonies, but the book itself begins with the engaging tale of two Craighead brothers capturing and training hawks in Depression-era Pennsylvania. This story-oriented style typifies Glorious Times, which recounts the lives of the historical Craigheads in lively detail, bringing readers into close, personal proximity to the subjects’ lives. Roughly chronologically, the book describes each significant Craighead chapter by chapter, always highlighting their nature-loving and environmental points. Since the family’s story begins so early in American history, the book spends several chapters working through older relatives, who predated what modern activists would recognize as environmentalism, before getting to the generations that produced the more famous conservationists and natural scientists. However, the theme of the Craigheads as nature-lovers, hikers, campers, and outdoorspeople remains a powerful thread throughout the book. The author’s research on the topic could not be more meticulous, incorporating typical genealogical sources, such as newspapers, as well as personal interviews with Jean Craighead George and family documents, such as diaries.

Particularly valuable to book people may be the insight that Glorious Times provides into the mind and personality of Jean Craighead George, who is presented as at once more liberal and ambitious than other Craighead women and fully in step with her family’s environmentalist tradition. Fans and critics of her work and of the roots of the twentieth century environmental stewardship movement will find this work a fascinating insight. Genealogists may also be interested in the book as an example of a family history well executed.