Joe Gilman Part II

How long Joe Gilman stayed in Minneapolis isn’t known nor is exactly what he did during this time period. Perhaps his Carlisle student file would shed a bit of light on it. We know that he eventually showed up at Carlisle because his name began to appear in the school’s newspaper. His first mention was for playing tackle in the first game of the 1913 football season against Albright College. He didn’t get further mention during the football season, probably because a more experienced player returned from summer break. Even though several star players left the team after each of the 1911 and 1912 seasons, the Indians sustained only one loss in each season from 1911-13. Joe Gilman was contending against some strong players.

 In December, he was listed as being in the receiving line with Mary Bailey at a reception held by the Susan Longstreth Society. Joe had either been at school for several years without receiving prior mention or had some education, particularly with English, prior to coming to Carlisle. Because he doesn’t seem to be listed on the 1910 Federal Census as being enrolled at Carlisle at that time, Joe probably hadn’t arrived many years before 1913.

 The Carlisle Arrow listed him as placing third in both 220-yard and 440-yard dashes in the handicap track meet held among students as part of 1914 Commencement activities during which Joe Gilman received an industrial certificate in blacksmithing. This implies that he was at Carlisle for at least two years prior to this. So, he likely came to Carlisle in 1911. However, he wasn’t finished yet.

Joe returned for the 1914-15 school year and was promoted to the Freshman class. He also played football but, again, wasn’t a starter. He did get into the Penn game and probably more but the line-ups weren’t generally included in the school paper’s coverage of that year’s games.

Joe Gilman was to be the starting center for the Freshman basketball team that winter but an opportunity in Detroit was of higher priority.

End of Part II

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